Last edited by Yozragore
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Hazard analysis of injuries relating to bunk beds. found in the catalog.

Hazard analysis of injuries relating to bunk beds.

United States. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Bureau of Epidemiology.

Hazard analysis of injuries relating to bunk beds.

by United States. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Bureau of Epidemiology.

  • 84 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bureau of Epidemiology in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Bunk beds -- United States -- Accidents -- Statistics.,
    • Wounds and injuries -- United States -- Statistics.

    • Classifications
      LC ClassificationsTS886.5.B4 U54 1975
      The Physical Object
      Pagination31 p. :
      Number of Pages31
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4690824M
      LC Control Number77602367

        Bunk bed-related injuries occur most frequently among males, and half of the cases analyzed involved children younger than 6 years of age. Bunk bed injuries most commonly result from falls. The most common bunk bed-related injuries include lacerations, contusions/abrasions . From broken bones to brain damage or paralysis, most severe injuries reported happened when students fell from the top bunk or loft. Other common causes of injuries and subsequent insurance claims include falls from improperly attached ladders and collapsed beds due to faulty brackets.

      or entrapment hazard). Victorian injury surveillance data shows that 86 percent of bunk-bed related injuries in the under fifteen age-group occur in children under the age of ten. While bunk-bed injuries peak in the year age-group, they still account for similar numbers of injuries as individual nursery products in the year age-group. Parents of young children should be aware of the dangers of bunk beds, and children under six should not be allowed to sleep in top bunks because of the risk of falls, doctors have said.

      Bunk Bed and Loft Bed Safety. Space-saving lofts and bunk beds are popular in residence halls, but UE claims show that students have suffered serious brain and spinal injuries after falling from these beds or the ladders attached to them. Schools and colleges can prevent these injuries by following a few safety precautions.   Bunk bed injuries have stayed stagnant with no reduction in the yearly incidents for over 16 years, according to a recent report by Here are a few tips on how to keep your kids safe on bunk beds; parents should apply them in order to avoid adding to the statistics and prevent bunk bed injuries.


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Hazard analysis of injuries relating to bunk beds by United States. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Bureau of Epidemiology. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Hazard analysis of injuries relating to bunk beds. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Bureau of Epidemiology.].

Hazard analysis of injuries relating to bunk beds. By U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Bureau of Epidemiology. Abstract "(NIIC HOOL)."Includes bibliographical references (page 17).Mode of access: Internet. Free falls are a common source of pediatric head trauma.

1 Falls account for the highest costs in unintentional home injuries, and the product associated with the highest cost in home injuries in young children was a bed. 2 Most reports of bunk bed-related injuries come from outside the US and document serious injuries and the inherent risk of bunk beds, especially for very young children.

Cited by: Most bunk bed-related injuries occur from falls while sleeping or playing. Injuries from bunk beds are usually worse than injuries from standard beds. Cuts are the most common injury, followed by bumps, bruises and broken bones.

The head and neck are injured the most. Who is at Risk. Half of all bunk bed-related injuries occur to children younger than 6. Injury surveillance data (VISS) shows that eighty-six percent of bunk bed-related injuries in children under fifteen years of age occur in children under ten years.

While bunk bed injuries peak in the year age group, they still account for similar numbers of injuries as individual nursery furniture products in the year age-group. Not all injuries result from rough play but can result when sleeping, and malfunctions. In the USA more t patients under age 21 landed in emergency rooms each year between and due to a bunkbed-related incident.

Due to the risks involved with bunk beds efforts have been made by parents to prevent bunk bed accidents. Although. injuries associated with nursery furniture and bunk beds 5 injury surveillance system using the existing hospital data collection system (using HAS software).

Falls were the most common mechanism of injury (about 73%). However, while playing or sleeping children sustain injuries resulting from falls, jumps, bunk bed ladders, bed malfunctions, and striking the bed. Bunk bed-related injuries have remained fairly consistent over the year period. Bunk bed-related injuries are not an issue of concern solely for parents of young children according to a study conducted by investigators at the Center for Injury Research.

Bunk beds are frequently used as a child's first regular or big-kid bed after he/she outgrows a crib—either at about age 2 or 35 inches ( mm) in height. Some bunk beds also are used separately as twin beds for older children and even adults.

Bunk bed injuries. Selbst SM(1), Baker MD, Shames M. Author information: (1)Emergency Department, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA Bunk beds are commonly used in American households, yet to our knowledge, no studies have been done to determine if they are by: In an average year, statistics show that ab bunk-bed-related injuries to children occur.

Most injuries stem from unsafe behavior around bunk beds, but some have also arisen from faulty construction. It stands to reason that consumers should always make sure the bunk beds they buy conform with the most recent construction standards Author: Abe Abbas.

Hazard Identification and Assessment for Safety & Health Programs Group similar incidents and identify trends in injuries, illnesses, and hazards reported.

or processes, seek the input of workers and evaluate the planned changes for potential hazards and related risks. Bunk beds have long been recognised as a potential source of injury to children. This study was undertaken to establish an evidence base for a proposed injury reduction program and to determine whether or not there is a case for a mandatory safety standard.

Recent literature on bunk bed safety was reviewed to provide an overview of the injury issues by: 5. Are there any standards that apply to bunk beds. ASTM F, a voluntary standard titled, "Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Bunk Beds," contains other requirements for the design and performance of bunk beds.

Are there any additional requirements for bunk beds. Yes. Bunk beds for children may not have sharp points or edges. The bunk beds have openings on the top bunk that present a potential entrapment hazard to young children. The spaces can be large enough for a child's body to pass through, but small enough to entrap a child's head.

Since NovemberCPSC and 31 manufacturers have announced recalls of more thanwooden bunk beds with similar. The U.S.

Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that 57 children died after being entrapped by bunk beds from towhich prompted stricter safety measures for constructing bunk beds. • Bunk beds are commonly used in American households, yet to our knowledge, no studies have been done to determine if they are safe.

We prospectively studied the incidence, epidemiology, and outcome of injuries related to bunk beds. We interviewed all patients with such injuries who presented to the Cited by: department for a bed injury, corresponding to an estimated incidence of about 3 per children years.

Out of bed fall injuries, % are from bunk beds, % from cribs, % from cots, and % from other conventional beds. Falls from the bed ladder accounted for 8% of all bunk bed by:   Nea children and adolescents are treated for bunk bed injuries in the nation’s emergency rooms each year, a new study says.

Cuts, bruises and fractures are most common. Every bunk bed must have an affixed label that states the bed's manufacturer, model, and mattress size information and advises against placing children under six years of age on the upper bunk. Bunk beds must have continuous guardrails on both sides of bed; the tops of the guardrails must be no less than 5 inches above the top of the mattress.

The most common injury within jails (72%) involved falling out of a bunk bed. In comparison to the general population, incarcerated individuals suffering bunk bed injuries were older, male, and twice as likely to be admitted to the hospital for their injuries.Many parents fear bunk beds aren’t as safe for their children as regular single story beds.

The truth of the matter is that bunk beds pass through a lot of safety inspections before they are able to be sold to the consumer. While the bed itself might be safe by design, that doesn’t mean accidents can’t happen.

Here are a few tips.